How Do I Find My Local DNS Server Address?

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Scott Campbell

How Do I Find My Local DNS Server Address?

When troubleshooting network connectivity issues or configuring advanced network settings, it’s often necessary to know the IP address of your local DNS (Domain Name System) server. The DNS server is responsible for translating human-readable domain names (like www.example.com) into computer-readable IP addresses.

Windows

If you’re using a Windows operating system, follow these steps to find your local DNS server address:

  1. Open the Command Prompt: Press the Windows key + R, type “cmd” (without quotes), and hit Enter. This will open the Command Prompt.
  2. Type the command: In the Command Prompt window, type “ipconfig /all” (without quotes) and press Enter.
  3. Look for “DNS Servers”: Scroll through the output until you find the section labeled “Ethernet adapter” or “Wireless adapter.”

    Under this section, look for the line that says “DNS Servers.” The IP address listed next to it is your local DNS server address.

Mac

If you’re using a Mac, here’s how you can find your local DNS server address:

  1. Open Network Preferences: Click on the Apple menu in the top-left corner of your screen and select “System Preferences.” In System Preferences, click on “Network.

  2. Select Your Network Connection: In the left sidebar of Network preferences, select your active network connection (Wi-Fi or Ethernet).
  3. Click on “Advanced”: At the bottom right corner of Network preferences, click on the “Advanced” button.
  4. Go to the “DNS” tab: In the Advanced settings window, navigate to the “DNS” tab.
  5. See the DNS Server Address: Under the DNS Servers section, you’ll find the IP addresses of your local DNS servers. If multiple addresses are listed, they are usually separated by commas.

Linux

If you’re using a Linux distribution, follow these steps to find your local DNS server address:

  1. Open a Terminal: Launch a Terminal window by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T or searching for “Terminal” in your applications menu.
  2. Type the command: In the Terminal, type “cat /etc/resolv.conf” (without quotes) and press Enter.
  3. Look for “nameserver”: The output will display one or more lines starting with “nameserver.” Each line represents a different DNS server. The IP address following “nameserver” is your local DNS server address.

Note: In some cases, you may have multiple network interfaces or virtual machines running on your system, each with its own DNS configuration. Make sure to check the correct network interface or virtual machine settings if you’re experiencing issues with specific applications or connections.

In conclusion, finding your local DNS server address is crucial when troubleshooting network problems or configuring custom network settings. By following these simple steps based on your operating system, you can quickly retrieve this information and proceed with resolving any connectivity issues you may encounter.

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